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April 19, 2024
GreentvAfrica News
AgricultureEnvironment

From food to floods, Africa ‘not ready’ for climate stress, its scientists say.

Growth in food production is slowing faster than in any other region of the world as climate change-driven droughts, floods, heat and pests take a toll.

* Africa ‘not on track’ to deal with climate change impacts.

* Lack of finance for adaptation and clean energy a problem.

* Threats to food security particularly high, scientists warn.

Africa’s population is set to nearly double by 2050 – but growth in food production is slowing faster than in any other region of the world as climate change-driven droughts, floods, heat and pests take a toll, African scientists said this week.

As rains grow more erratic, the hydropower many African countries depend on to run their economies is becoming unreliable, while coastal communities face worsening erosion, heat, flooding and migration of fish stocks they depend on.

But the money African nations need to tackle those threats is largely missing or coming only in the form of loans, while poor governance and siloed thinking about how to address the problems are hampering effective action, the scientists noted.

“We are not on track to achieve climate resilience,” said Youba Sokona, Malian vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), as the U.N. science body released a report on impacts, adaptation and vulnerability to global warming this week.

It warned that, around the world, efforts to adapt to accelerating pressures – from more extreme heat and drought to increasingly severe floods and sea level rise – are inadequate and threaten billions of people as fossil fuel use keeps rising.

That is despite a range of smart measures to adapt to the impacts – from early warning systems to beefed-up social welfare and growing use of natural flood barriers like coastal mangroves – which are showing promise in many parts of the world.

The new report by 270 leading climate scientists “is a dire warning about the consequences of inaction”, said Hoesung Lee, the IPCC’s chair.

Reuters.

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